“Messages from the Virus” in online exhibit @Arts Tropical Okinawa

Artists online exhibit

AT HOME/ FROM YOUR SPACE

Art Tropical Okinawa

 

James JACK

Messages from the Virus

ウィルスからのメッセージ

 

14 April 

“Slow down or perish” the virus seems to be saying to us. It has messages for us. Each day from now on during the “circuit breaker” in Singapore (or “lockdown” in other places) I will find one message the virus is sending us and attempt to translate it into words.

First message:
Love each other, especially from a distance.

Tomorrow I will do the same. Listen to the virus and its carriers to see what they want to say to us. If people listen, perhaps we can improve from this situation from calamity towards one that is more in tune to our environment, each other and the society that we want to become in the future.

「ペースを落とすか、滅びるか」。ウィルスが私たちにそう言っているようだ。これは私たちに向けたメッセージなのである。シンガポールが「サーキットブレーカー」(他の土地では「ロックダウン」と呼ばれている)となるこれからの日々のなかで、私はウイルスが私たちに送ってくるメッセージから一つを選び、それらを言葉に訳していこうと思う。

最初のメッセージ:
互いに愛しあおう、特に距離があるところから。

私は明日も同じことをする。彼らが私たちに何を伝えたいのかを理解するために、ウィルスとそれが運ぶものに耳を傾ける。人々が耳を傾けることで、この状況を災難から、環境やお互い、そして未来にそうなりたい社会に合わせて、改善していくことができるかもしれない。

 

Continues here:

https://artstropicalokinawa.tumblr.com/tagged/jamesjack

Colors Born in Light

On a cloudy April day, just as the first cherry blossoms were beginning to open, I met Shingo Francis at the Kawamura DIC Museum, in Japan, where his work featured in the exhibition “The Unseen Relationship: Form and Abstraction.” Born in Santa Monica, California, in 1969, Francis’ works are saturated with layers of thin oil washes that draw the eye closer to what the artist calls “the Abyss.” Despite having an oceanic aura, Shingo’s perspective is not one of looking across the sea as in traditional landscape paintings. Instead, his perspective is one of being submerged or immersed in the ocean, unable to recognize sky from saltwater.

Read the full interview I did with Shingo Francis at Art Asia Pacific online

Installation view of SHINGO FRANCIS’ Bound for Eternity (space), 2011, and SAM FRANCIS’ Untitled (Blue), 1951–52.